March 18, 2014


According to recent research, raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour would help lower federal spending on food stamps because the higher wage would reduce both the number of food stamp recipients and the amount of aid they receive.  


It is unlikely however, that Hoosiers can count on the state to increase the minimum wage here in Indiana. Indiana House Democrats attempted to raise the minimum wage with an amendment to SB 213 this session.  It was defeated on a party line vote.


20 states, including our neighbors in Illinois, Michigan and Ohio, have minimum wages higher than Indiana.


More than 93,000 workers earn the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour in Indiana according to the US Department of Labor.


Could you and your family live on minimum wage? This interactive calculator demonstrates the tough choices minimum wage earning families must make.


Raising the minimum wage is of special interest to educators because we know it will help our students whose parents work hard to support their families and we know it could help many of our fellow educators—cafeteria employees, custodians and bus drivers do not earn a living wage.

Men and women who dedicate their lives to driving, nourishing, counseling, or teaching our nation’s students should not be forced to live at or below the poverty line.


Since the General Assembly has adjourned, Hoosiers’ next hope is for Federal action on increasing the federal minimum wage. However, some in Congress, including every Republican member of Indiana’s Congressional delegation are opposed to raising the federal minimum wage.

Indiana needs to create an economy for everyone.


With a higher minimum wage, more reflective of today’s cost of living, workers will have more money to spend--which will result in increased consumerism, ultimately boosting the economy.


We hope that Indiana’s members of Congress can unite around helping workers and the economy by supporting an increase to the minimum wage.